Photos of Galaxies

Click on picture to enlarge



 
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Super Nova (SN 2011dh)





approx 6 hrs 

LRGB 8 hrs digital processing 
June 19th 2011
Brian McGaffney
Occurence on M51 shown here in detail taken at the Nutwood Observatory.
Compared this to the image of M51 taken only a month before. This Super Nova was
of a yellow supergiant star, at 14 magnitude,  14-18 times our solar mass.  M51
is about 25 million light years from our galaxy.
 
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Pinwheel Galaxy M101 or NGC 5457 located in the constellation
Ursa Major (The Big Dipper). M101 is slightly larger than our 
galaxy with a size of about 170 thousand light years across. 
It is about 25 million light years away from us. It shines at 
about magnitude 9.0 and is visible with a good telescope. However 
to observe the detailed arm structures seen in my image, one 
requires a very large telescope. I was using a 17 inch Truss 
scope for this image.

As you can see by the image, M101 is an asymmetrical galaxy. Its 
spiral arms being forcefully bothered by adjacent neighbouring 
satellite galaxies. The soft pink hues situated in the arms of 
the spirals, are hot star forming regions and are rich in H II 
emissions. These regions were imaged here with the aid of other 
narrow band techniques.

Imaged by Brian McGaffney
 
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M31
Standard Nikon D80 DSLR
William Optics M110, 690mm focal length, f6.0
0.8 factor field flattener to yield an effective 552mm @ f4.8
Skywatcher EQ6 Pro German Equatorial with drive, polar aligned for photo
None
498 seconds (8.3 minutes)
1
Contrast enhanced with Photoshop Elements
August 31, 2008
 
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M31 taken over two nights at the Nutwood Observatory on 
Sept 5th and 6th, 2012.
 
Data, LRGB+Ha   12 hrs total.   Using a W.O. 132 with 
SBIG 6303e with Astrodon filters. Plus 20 hrs of digital 
development.
 
Piggy backed on an ME.
 
M31 plus M32 and M110 in the background.
 
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M51  the whirlpool galaxy 23 million light years away

Shot with Mallincam Jr. Pro with MFR-5 focal reducer on a 
Mallincam VRC-6 6 RC optical tube mounted on the 
EQ6 Pro mount. M51 was a 30 second integration.

Short videos were captured then image created using RegiStax 6.

Taken by Rodger Forsyth
 
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M81

20 inch Truss Scope

ME

10 hrs.

20 hrs
March 2011
Brian McGaffney
Taken at the Nutwood Observatory March 2011. Part of the pair M81 and M82.
Perhaps the most perfect Spiral Galaxy in the night sky, thanks to close 
encounters with its neighbour M82 some 600 million years ago. It is a bright 
galaxy with magnitude of about 6.2.
 
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I was out looking and working on M82 
for a few nights (in the remote observatory. 
Any way, here is mine taken form the dome 
with a 14 inch astro graph using and 
apogee 4096x4096.

This is an HALRGB image taken basically 
Jan 29th to Jan 30th.

Brian McGaffney
 
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M82 (Cigar Galaxy). Hi Res close-up (24 meg) CCD image LLRGB (6,3,2,2) hrs. 
Taken at Nutwood Observatory April 2011.
f9 Ceravolo, ME mount, guided subs 20 min


Messier 82 (M82, NGC 3034) is a remarkable galaxy of peculiar type in constellation
Ursa Major. It is usually classified as irregular, though probably a distorted disk
galaxy, and famous for its heavy star-forming activity, thus a prototype member of 
the class of starbursting galaxies.

Forming a most conspicuous physical pair with its neighbor, M81 (THE showpiece 
galaxies for many Northern hemispherers), this galaxy is the prototype of an 
irregular of the second type, i.e. a "disk" irregular. Its core seems to have 
suffered dramatically from a semi-recent close encounter with M81, being in a 
heavy starburst and displaying conspicuous dark lanes. This turbulent explosive 
gas flow is also a strong source of radio noise, discovered by Henbury Brown in 
1953. The radio source was first called Ursa Major A (strongest radio source in UMa) 
and cataloged as 3C 231 in the Third Cambridge Catalogue of Radio Sources.

In the infrared light, M82 is the brightest galaxy in the sky; it exhibits a 
so-called infrared excess (it is much brighter at infrared wavelengths than in the 
visible part of the spectrum). This behaviour can also be observed for the companion 
of M51, NGC 5195, and the peculiar galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A). The visual 
appearance is that of a silvery sliver, as John Mallas decribed it.

Recently, over 100 freshly-formed (young) globular clusters have been discovered 
with the Hubble Space Telescope. Their formation is probably another effect 
triggered by the encounter with M81. It was estimated that the most recent tidal 
encounter occurred between about 50 and several 100 million years ago: STScI's 
most recent number was 600 million years, when the 100-million-year-long period 
of heavier interaction began.

As a member of the M81 group, M82 is 12 million light years distant

Brian McGaffney
 
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Milky Way

DSLR Canon 40d. Each image was acquired thru an 18mm lens at 4.0 ISO 1600. The
mount used was an EQpro 6 on a pier tech 2 pier. Each image was 2 minutes
guided, a seperate set of 5 images were taken ,then stiched to-gether.

Brian McGaffney
 
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Our home in space - Milky Way.

Brian McGaffney
 
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NGC7331_7318
 
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NGC 772 Spiral Galaxy

NGC 772 is a spiral galaxy, approximately 130 million light-years away,
in the constellation Aries. Below and slightly to the right, is the satellite
galaxy NGC 770, which is probably responsible for NGC 772's peculiar shape.

Also, there are a lot of dwarf galaxies visible in the immediate neighborhood
that may also be interacting with NGC 772.


Brian McGaffney - Nutwood Observatory
 
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Hi res close up of NGC 891.  One can zoom in 
on NGC 891 and look at some great detail of  
the edges of the galaxy.

Brian McGaffney
 
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NGC 4321 (M100) is a faint spiral galaxy and is part 
of the Virgo Cluster  located in Coma Berenices. 
NGC 4321 is around magnitude 10 and distance from earth 
about 65 million light years. The galaxy is a pure 
representation of what a spiral galaxy looks like. 
In the images attached, it shows many of the faint 
associated galaxy's associated with this object. The 
fainter object located in the image towards 2 o'clock is 
another distant spiral, and since in proximity to M100 
has some effect on its behaviour.

Imaging time for these photos was about 8 hours total 
taken by myself at the Nutwood Observatory last week.   
Image was guided and used an Apogee U16M liquid cooled 
CCD camera with a DK 300 MM Astrograph telescope. Acquistion
was done remotely .Processing was done using Pixinsight, 
MaxIm DLPro and PS Cs5.


Imaged by Brian McGaffney