Latest Member Photos

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Rosette Nebula (NGC2244)

Telescope: astro-tech at80edt
Camera: nikon d5300 full-spectrum
Mount: celestron avx

RGB: 5 min x 26
Ha: 10 min x 11

Processed in Pixinsight

Taken by : James Lee
 
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Markarian's Chain

Telescope: astro-tech 80edt
Camera: nikon d5300 full-spectrum
Filter: idas lps d1 48mm
Mount: celestron avx

5 min x 49 (total 4 hr 5 min)
Processed in Pixinsight

Taken by : James Lee
 
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Leo Triplet

It was a bit of a challenge with a small telescope

Scope : Astro-tech at80edt
Camera : Nikon d5300 full-spectrum
Mount : Celestron avx

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51 x 3 min subs
Processed in pixinsight

Taken by : James Lee
 
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Bear Paw Galaxy NGC2537

This image is NGC 2537 known as the Bear Paw Galaxy due to its peculiar form.  It is a face-on barred
spiral galaxy in Lynx.  It is magnitude + 12.3 and 22 million light years distant.

Its appearance is rather striking.  Zoom in to see why it is called the Bear Paw Galaxy.  The star forming 
regions give the appearance of a bear's paw.

Look closely and you will see a large number of other galaxies, looking like faint grey smudges or out of
focused stars.  The most obvious in IC 2233 to the lower right.  This is another barred spiral galaxy, but
with an edge-on orientation.  It is magnitude + 12.63 and 40 million light years away.

The image was also captured with a MallinCam DS10C TEC camera.  It is a stack of 30 images
(10 @ 5 seconds, 10 @ 9 seconds and 10 @ 15 seconds) all done within the capture software. No
post processing or filters were used.


Taken by : Brett Hardy
 
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Medusa Nebula (Abell 21)

This is the Medusa Nebula (Abell 21), a planetary nebula in Gemini.  A planetary nebula represents the
death of a low mass star.  What you see is the outer shells of the star blown off into space by the central
star.  You can see the central star in the image.  It has a slight blue hue.  Zoom in to see it more clearly
as well as the outer shells of gas.

The Medusa Nebula was discovered in 1955 and until the early 1980's was thought to be a supernova remnant.

This object is 12.4 x 8.5 arcminutes in size; magnitude + 10.91 and 1,500 light years away.  Because of
its large size, it has a very low surface brightness (SkySafari 6 Plus says between + 16 and + 25 magnitude).  

The image was captured with a MallinCam DS10C TEC camera.  It is a stack of 30 images (10 @ 17 
seconds, 10 @ 22 seconds and 10 @ 27 seconds) all done within the capture software - I don't have 
the patience for post processing.  No filters were used.


Taken by : Brett Hardy