Photos of the Moon

Click on picture to enlarge



The new (less than 48 hours old) Moon tonight at about 17:40 from Fairview Church. 1/8sec@ f/6.3,
200mm fl,
ISO 25600, handheld, Sony a6000.

As far as I can tell the star to the left is p Sgr  (Mag. 2.9).

Image by: Seán Dunne

December 19, 2017

2020-Apr 2 - B. Colville - Moon

A couple of clear days here allowed some solar imaging, and a chance to image Venus and the Pleiades
as they draw closer together. I will likely be clouded out tomorrow night, so I was glad to have
clear skies
after sunset tonight.

The image of Venus and M45 was taken through a William Optics 70mm, f6 ED and the Canon 60D
camera, with a 5 sec exposure, and earlier in the evening I shot a few images of the moon through
the
Stellarvue 110ED.

I hope that these sights were visible and taken in by as many people on the planet as possible...an
escape
however brief from the events we are mired in.

Taken by : Brian Colville
Date : 2020 - Apr 2

2020-Apr 6 - G. Porter - Moon

I did hold my camera still long enough for this photo tonight (slightly altered orientation but as
with motion ,
that too is relative).

Taken by : Geoff Porter
Date : 2020-Apr 6

2020-August 25 - M. McCarthy - Lunar_X

This was taken on Aug 25 at 10pm. I had heard about the lunar x but never really looked for it. As
it happened on that evening I was doing some other imaging and needed to repark my scope and make
adjustments. The moon was an easy target to slew to and get a quick align and sync with the
planetarium program. I had slew right to it at f/22 and found it without looking for it!! I had to
look up references to check which I have included below. Note that my image is flipped to the map.
It was incredible luck with the timing and positioning. Sometimes a blind squirrel finds a nut!!

Lunar X

The Lunar "X" is a transient optical feature of the Moon that occurs for about 4 hours near First
Quarter phase of the Moon. Because the Earth is not always in the same place when the Moon is in
this ideal sunlight location, not everywhere on Earth will always see the Lunar "X" phenomenon every
month. However, it occurs frequently enough for most areas that it can be seen, on average, every
few months. And it's a bright enough feature that it can even be seen in daylight - if you know when
and where to look.

So WHERE is it? In the southern section of the Moon, there are a LOT of craters. The southern
highlands are filled with them, whereas much of the northern region is dominated by the darker,
lava-filled maria. Check out this labelled graphic below to see where the “Lunar X” is visible among
some of the larger craters. This graphic shows the "X" as it would appear as it is just becoming
visible - see bottom of the page for the "X" at a more prominently lit time.

Visible due to sunlight striking the tops of three craters – Purbach, LaCaille and Blanchinus – the
“X” occurs when the sun is rising and striking the very top of each of them. This feature is easily
visible even in very small telescopes, and tripod-mounted binoculars can show it to sharp-eyed
observers. Despite it's best apparitions occurring when the sky is dark, the “X” is prominent and
visible during daylight hours

Taken by : Mike McCarthy

2020-July 1 - B. Colville - Copernicus

I was not able to join the virtual star party sessions but was able to get my C14
mounted in the dome last weekend and spent a few evenings testing out the
wiring, scope and camera controls to be sure everything was working.  The
images attached were taken on Sunday and Wednesday night.  The moon
always shows amazing details along the terminator and these sessions were
no exception.

Taken by : Brian Colville
Date : July 1, 2020

2020-July 1 - B. Colville - Moon

I was not able to join the virtual star party sessions but was able to get my C14
mounted in the dome last weekend and spent a few evenings testing out the
wiring, scope and camera controls to be sure everything was working.  The
images attached were taken on Sunday and Wednesday night.  The moon
always shows amazing details along the terminator and these sessions were
no exception.

Taken by : Brian Colville
Date : July 1, 2020

2020-July 1 - B. Colville - Plato

I was not able to join the virtual star party sessions but was able to get my C14
mounted in the dome last weekend and spent a few evenings testing out the
wiring, scope and camera controls to be sure everything was working.  The
images attached were taken on Sunday and Wednesday night.  The moon
always shows amazing details along the terminator and these sessions were
no exception.

Taken by : Brian Colville
Date : July 1, 2020

2020-July 3 - C. Smith - Moon

Taken by : Chuck Smith
Date : July 3, 2020

Moon

Out for a bit last night with scope and camera on deck..
12 inch dob, Canon Rebel XS, no lens just a two inch adapter.

Taken by : Chuck Smith
Date : 2020-Mar 27

Moon

I had the same idea, but tried just with my camera (Nikon P900) at 2000mm

Taken by : Rick Stankiewicz
Date : 2020 - Mar 27

May 6, 2020 - Super Moon

Super Moon taken with a Huawei pro p20 45mp LEICA CAMERA

Taken by :  David Mills

2020-Oct 31 - Rick Stankiewicz - What a Bootiful Moon on Halloween

The timing, the colours and the atmosphere. Bang on! These shots were all taken looking east of
Keene at 6:30 p.m. after moonrise and I have NOT added any colour or enhanced the images in any way.
It was orange for Halloween, a true Boo Moon! Included is an extra spooky one with the clouds for
effect, which gave it an almost pumpkin-like appearance? Put a stem on it and you have a lunar
pumpkin.

Within 10 minutes of taking these shots the lunar disk was turning yellow and shortly after that,
the usual white, bright Full Moon (like any other). As they say, “It is all about timing.”

2020-October 5 - Brian Colville - Mars_10062020_0343UT

Mars seems to be a popular target these days, and I found myself out again last night.

The attached images were taken at approximately 11:43 EDT (03:43 UR), through the C14 and a ZWO
camera.  The left most image is a colour and IR images combined, and the center is the IR pass
filtered image only.  The right side shows the simulated view with features labeled.

Through the scope it looked beautiful…very steady seeing at this time shortly before midnight.

Albategnius

Copernicus

Crescent Moon








Feb.18.07

Earthshine

Full Moon








01.02.07

Mare Crisium

Moon - 1

Moon - 2

Moon - 3

Moon

raw cvt. adobe levels. ip sharpen jpeg






29_06_07

Moon Correct

Moon Pines








2003

2017-Sept 1 - Rodger Forsyth - Moon9

This image was taken Sept 1st, 2017 after the meeting using a Mallincam SSIc in monochrome mode for
a 35 second .avi. Processed in Registax 6, no other processing involved. Camera mounted on
Sky-Watcher ED120 riding the EQ6 mount.

Photo by Rodger Forsyth

Moonrise








2005

Moonrise Silhouettes








Aug.03

Moonset








04.05.04

Original Crescent Moon

Petavius

Ptolemaeus

Rabbit in Moon

Rupes Recta

Sea of Moisture

Seas of Serenity and Tranquility