Latest Member Photos

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2020-June 13 - B. Hardy - M16 Eagle Nebula

Mallincam DS10CTEC camera, Gain 50 DB2 14s 86 frames Gamma 0.90 DFC_LeNh

175mm TMB refractor using a narrow band Optolong L-eNhance filter.  No post processing
was used.  Images are screen captures only.

M16, The Eagle Nebula in Serpens Cauda.  This is a giant emission nebula with open cluster 
NGC 6611 having formed from its gas and dust as well as dark nebulae interspersed.  The 
central dark nebula forms the iconic eagle shape.  Located 7,000 light years away, the gas is 
being ionized by massive young O6 stars - the hottest high-energy stars, causing the gas to 
glow and emit light.

Taken by : Brett Hardy
Date : June 13, 2020
 
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2020-June 13 - B. Hardy - Western Veil Nebula

Mallincam DS10CTEC camera, Gain 80 25s 30 frames Gamma 0.90 DFC LeNh

175mm TMB refractor using a narrow band Optolong L-eNhance filter.  
No post processing was used.  Images are screen captures only.

Western Veil Nebula - 30 stacked frames @ 25 seconds.   NGC 6960, the Western Veil Nebula
in Cygnus, is a portion of a supernova remnant that occurred 5,000 to 8,000 years ago.  
Discovered by William Herschel in 1784, this object is 2,600 light years distant.

Taken by : Brett Hardy
Date : June 13, 2020
 
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2020-June 14 - M. McCarthy - Bubble  Nebula and M52

This past week it has been extremely kind to us stargazers. Thanks to Brett for setting up 
our Zoom  Virtual Star Parties .

This is the  Bubble  Nebula and M52 June 14 11:07 pm. A stack of 21x  18 sec exposures  
Gain 10 Gamma at 1.3 using Idas LPS D2 filter with Dark Field Correction and histogram 
adjustments in the MallincamSky program only. No further processing used but feel free to 
manipulate in your favorite photo editing software.


Taken by: Mike McCarthy
Date : June 14, 2020
 
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2020-June 14 - M. McCarthy - North American Nebula

This is the  North American Nebula June 14 11:42 pm. A stack of 16x  30 sec 
exposures  Gain 10 Gamma at 1.3 using Idas LPS D2 filter with Dark Field 
Correction and histogram adjustments in the MallincamSky program only. No 
further processing used but feel free to manipulate in your favorite photo editing 
software.

Taken by: Mike McCarthy
Date : June 14, 2020
 
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2020-June 16 - M. McCarthy - Elephant Trunk Nebula

This is the  Elephant Trunk Nebula June 16 11:59 pm. A stack of 25x  30 sec 
exposures White point 25 Gain 10 Gamma at 1.3 using Idas LPS D2 filter with 
Dark Field Correction and histogram adjustments in the MallincamSky program 
only. No further processing used but feel free to manipulate in your favorite photo 
editing software.


Taken by: Mike McCarthy
Date : June 16, 2020
 
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2020-June 16 - M. McCarthy - Pelican Nebula

This past week it has been extremely kind to us stargazers. Thanks to Brett for 
setting up our Zoom  Virtual Star Parties.  This is the  Pelican Nebula June 16 
11:12 pm. A stack of 15x  30 sec exposures  white point 34 Gain 10 
Gamma at 1.3 using Idas LPS D2 filter with Dark Field Correction and histogram 
adjustments in the MallincamSky program only. No further processing used but 
feel free to manipulate in your favorite photo editing software.


Taken by: Mike McCarthy
Date : June 16, 2020
 
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2020-June 13 - R.. Stankiewicz -  Venus 0.6 degrees from 27.7 day old Moon

Did anyone else get up at 4:00 a.m. this morning to see the most amazing conjunction of the 
year (maybe years)?  I think on the east coast they actually had an occultation, but here if you 
had a clear ENE horizon you could catch Venus only 0.6 degrees from a 3.7% illuminated 
waning crescent Moon (27.7 days old). I had about a 15 to 20 window to get any images 
before clouds and the Sun changed the view. Venus actually was pulling away from the Moon 
every passing minute. Very cool to see and image.

When I was waiting for the big event I was "treated" to a barrage of Starlink satellites straight 
overhead. For 30 seconds a string of single and paired lights flew overhead. Freaky but cool, 
in an odd sort of way.

Taken by: Rick Stankiewicz
Date : June 19, 2020
 
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2020-June 13 - R.. Stankiewicz -  Venus 0.6 degrees from 27.7 day old Moon

Did anyone else get up at 4:00 a.m. this morning to see the most amazing conjunction of the 
year (maybe years)?  I think on the east coast they actually had an occultation, but here if you 
had a clear ENE horizon you could catch Venus only 0.6 degrees from a 3.7% illuminated 
waning crescent Moon (27.7 days old). I had about a 15 to 20 window to get any images 
before clouds and the Sun changed the view. Venus actually was pulling away from the Moon 
every passing minute. Very cool to see and image.

When I was waiting for the big event I was "treated" to a barrage of Starlink satellites straight 
overhead. For 30 seconds a string of single and paired lights flew overhead. Freaky but cool, 
in an odd sort of way.

Taken by: Rick Stankiewicz
Date : June 19, 2020
 
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2020-June 26 - R. Forsyth - M27 Dumbbell nebula

Camera: Mallincam Xterminator

I was out last night trying a few things with the Mallincam Xterminator and got M27 
the Dumbbell nebula and M57 the Ring nebula. These are one shot, no stacking 
about 22 seconds with minor contrast tweak.

I did a Go To to the Western Veil but the clouds decided I wasn't going to capture it.


Taken by: Rodger Forsyth
Date: June 26, 2020
 
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2020-June 26 - R. Forsyth - M57 Ring nebula

Camera: Mallincam Xterminator

I was out last night trying a few things with the Mallincam Xterminator and got M27 
the Dumbbell nebula and M57 the Ring nebula. These are one shot, no stacking 
about 22 seconds with minor contrast tweak.

I did a Go To to the Western Veil but the clouds decided I wasn't going to capture it.


Taken by: Rodger Forsyth
Date: June 26, 2020
 
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2020-May 1 - J. Lee -Tulip nebula and its surroundings

Last night, after the moon set, I went out to shoot Tulip nebula (sh2-101). Its was only for a short amount of time but 
I'm surprised how much it revealed.

Telescope: Astro-tech AT80edt
Camera: Nikon D5300
Mount: Celestron AVX

Acquisition: 3 min x 26, iso 200
Processed in Pixinsight

Taken by : James Lee
Date : May 1, 2020
 
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2020-May 12 - B. Hardy - SN 2020jfo - Type II Supernova in M61

SN 2020jfo is a Type II supernova in M61.  It was first detected May 6th.  We took a look at it last night during the 
Zoom broadcast.  M61 is 40 million light years from Earth and the supernova is currently around  magnitude 14.2.  
Just think, this star exploded 40 million years ago and this light is just now reaching Earth, amazing!

The supernova is too dim to see in binoculars or in a telescope without camera aid.  In a very large amateur
telescope it may just be at the limit of visual detection.  With a camera at 12 seconds it is obvious.  I have attached 
a snap from last night.

Taken by : Brett Hardy
Date : May 12, 2020
 
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May 6, 2020 - Super Moon

Super Moon taken with a Huawei pro p20 45mp LEICA CAMERA 

Taken by :  David Mills